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Women and Startups: Surviving the Emotional Roller Coaster

Women and Start-ups: Surviving the Emotional Roller Coaster

Karin Abarbanel knows firsthand what a wild ride the emotional roller coaster of giving “birth” to a new venture can be. Especially for women, as they tend to respond different than men to challenges and obstacles.

Women and Start-ups: Surviving the Emotional Roller CoasterKarin is a marketing firm owner and co-author of “Birthing the Elephant.” She shares front-line advice from successful female entrepreneurs on finding the emotional staying power to weather those tender first months of a launch – and avoid costly pitfalls that can derail your dream.

Below are some of the topics Karin and Anita discuss:

  • Emotional issues will surface — throughout the launch. No more fancy office building, no more big conference rooms and now you are operating in a more basic fashion. As a result, this may create image anxiety and impulse spending may begin to take place with money being spent on high tech equipment and expensive home offices in order to bolster image.
  • Getting out and promoting your business — can be intimidating. It may feel unnatural to promote yourself but you don’t need professional help or costly advertising. Get the word out through creativity in a grass roots sort of way and master the skill of your comfort level.
  • Loneliness and isolation — are issues that an entrepreneur will face. You’re no longer in an office environment with a built in support system. Reach out and build a support system of fellow entrepreneurs or work from home friends and meet once a week for coffee. Offer support to one another to pull you through tough times and brainstorm with each other. Feeling isolated can hamper your success.
  • Learn to recognize trivial — pursuits. Wearing many hats during startup is expected, however, as your business grows you need to delegate tasks to others so your attention is not diverted and burnout doesn’t occur. It may be time to hire some assistance in order to lower your frustration level and keep your focus.
  • Don’t get so caught up in your business — that you loose sight as to WHY you’re even in business. Many people start off wanting to spend more free time with family or on outside activities. Ultimately, they end up spending more hours working as an entrepreneur – than they did as an employee. Set clear boundaries, take time for yourself and allow yourself to enjoy the flexibility of owning your own business. Outside activities are re-energizing and very necessary to the success of your endeavour and your overall happiness.
  • Underpricing products and services –can be a problem for women. If you do this in launch mode, you’re doomed to play catch up. Do your research, start with a healthy pricing strategy and set realistic, competitive prices for your products and services. You deserve it!

Karin shared many helpful insights and solutions into the emotional issues that arise during these transitional periods in both men and women’s lives. Listen to Karin’s full interview by clicking the red and yellow player below now.

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11 Responses to “Women and Startups: Surviving the Emotional Roller Coaster”

  1. Moving From Me To We.com » Blog Archive » Business Partnering: Earn Money Without Wasting Everyone’s Time Says:

    [...] I am honored to be on her show.  Other interviews I recommend are of Birthing the Elephant author Karin Abarbanel, Toilet Paper Entrepreneur author Michael Michalowicz and Laurel Delaney of The Global Small [...]

  2. Mary Grace Ignacio Says:

    I’m looking forward to listen to this podcast. This will be very helpful to stay emotionally fit for your business.

  3. Amanda Says:

    It’s so important to take time for yourself. I find that having a hobby or interest outside of business helps me clear my mind. The next morning, I’m refreshed and can see things more clearly than if I was all consumed by it. Stepping away and going for a short stroll with my dog helps too. :)

  4. Mary Grace Ignacio Says:

    Amanda, I agree with you. We have to live our lives fully and rest and relaxation is part of that. We shouldn’t let ourselves rely fully on our business or else, it won’t be called a satisfying life.

  5. Mary Says:

    The book sounds like a good read. And its nice for those in this situation to know that they’re not alone and that others are experiencing the very same feelings.

  6. Mary Grace Ignacio Says:

    Yes. Mary, you’re right. It does give us strength if we knew we’re not alone in a certain situation and that we will always have companions in thriving together against these odds.

  7. Rose Anderson Says:

    Emotional issues will surface — throughout the launch. No more fancy office building, no more big conference rooms and now you are operating in a more basic fashion. As a result, this may create image anxiety and impulse spending may begin to take place with money being spent on high tech equipment and expensive home offices in order to bolster image. –> This is so true, Karin! This goes not only to the owner but also to their employees. Employees often tend to feel good with fancy office buildings. : (

  8. How to survive an emotional roller coaster « Small Business Lessons Says:

    [...] found this podcast to be really helpful – Women and Startups: Surviving the Emotional Roller Coaster. Please do not be confused with the title, men you are still very welcome to listen to this podcast. [...]

  9. Martin Lindeskog Says:

    Karin,

    I wanted to sign up for:

    “FREE
    Smart Startup Kit

    Free Report: 3 Big Start-up Mistakes & How to Avoid Them
    Free Launch Road map
    Free Ace Your Start-up ezine”

    but I got an error message…

  10. Martin Lindeskog Says:

    Some comments on:

    – Getting out and promoting your business.

    Have you heard about Business Network International?

    – Don’t get so caught up in your business.

    Have you heard about David Allen’s “Getting Things Done” method, balancing your work-life activities and agreements?

  11. Women Startups Says:

    Great post. There are many mixed feelings and emotions when beginning the adventure of starting a business, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be done. Thanks for the post!
    -Kate

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